The Changing Face of Science: Part Two

In my last post, I wrote about how scientists are beginning to engage with the public, particularly via social media and blogs. Here, I will use my recent experiences at the AAAS conference to illustrate how social media are changing the business of science itself.

The AAAS conference was the first science meeting I’ve attended as an active tweeter. The experience opened my eyes. Throughout the event, scientists and science writers were tweeting interesting talks or points made in various sessions. Essentially, this gave me ears and eyes throughout the conference. For instance, during a slow moment in the session I was attending, I checked out the #AAAS hashtag on Twitter and saw several intriguing tweets from people in another session:

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These tweets drew my attention to a talk that I would otherwise have missed completely. I could then decide if I wanted to switch to the other session or learn more about the speaker and her work later on. Even if I did neither, I’d learned a few interesting facts with minimal effort.

Twitter can be a very useful tool for scientists. Aside from its usefulness at conferences, it’s a great way to learn about new and exciting papers in your field. Those who aren’t on Twitter might be surprised to hear that it can be a source for academic papers rather than celebrity gossip. Ultimately, the information you glean from Twitter depends entirely on the people you choose to follow. Scientists often follow other scientists in their own or related fields. Thus, they’re more likely to come upon a great review on oligodendrocytes than news on Justin Bieber’s latest antics. Scientists and science writers form their own interconnected Twitter networks through which they share the type of content that interests them.

Katie Mack, an astrophysicist at the University of Melbourne, has logged some 32,000 tweets as @AstroKatie and has about 7,300 followers on Twitter to date. She recently explained on the blog Real Scientists why she joined Twitter in the first place:

“Twitter started out as an almost purely professional thing for me — I used it to keep up with what other physicists and astronomers were talking about, what people were saying at conferences, that kind of thing. It’s great for networking as well, and just kind of seeing what everyone is up to, in your own field and in other areas of science. Eventually I realized it could also be a great tool for outreach and for sharing my love of science with the world.”

Social media and the Internet more broadly have also made new avenues of scientific research possible. They’ve spurred citizen science projects and collaborative online databases like the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration. Yet social media and online content have also affected research on a smaller scale as individual scientists discover the science diamonds in the rough. For example, Amina Khan described in a recent Los Angeles Times article how a group of scientists mined online content to compare the strategies different animals use to swim. She writes:

“They culled 112 clips from sites like YouTube and Vimeo depicting 59 different species of flying and swimming animals in action, including moths, bats, birds and even humpback whales. They wanted to see where exactly the animals’ wings (or fins) bent most, and exactly how much they bent.”

Another wonderful example of the influence of YouTube on science came to my attention at the AAAS meeting when I attended a session on rhythmic entrainment in non-human animals. Rhythmic entrainment is the ability to match your movements to a regular beat, such as when you tap your foot to the rhythm of a song. Only five years ago it was widely believed that the ability to match a beat is unique to humans . . . that is, until Aniruddh Patel of Tufts University received an email from his friend.

As Dr. Patel described in the AAAS session, the friend wrote to share a link to a viral YouTube video of a cockatoo named Snowball getting down to the Backstreet Boys. What did Patel make of it? Although the bird certainly seemed to be keeping the beat, it was impossible to know what cues the animal was receiving off-screen. Instead of shrugging off the video or declaring it a fraud, Patel contacted the woman who posted it. She agreed to collaborate with Patel and let him test Snowball under carefully controlled conditions. Remarkably, Snowball was still able to dance to various beats. Patel and his colleagues published their results in 2009, upending the field of beat perception.

That finding sparked a string of new experiments with various species and an entertaining lineup of speakers and animal videos at the AAAS session. Among them, I had the pleasure of watching a sea lion nodding along to “Boogie Wonderland” and a bonobo pounding on a drum.

In essence, the Internet and social media are bringing new opportunities to the doorsteps of scientists. As Dr. Patel’s experience shows, it’s wise to open the door and invite them in. Like everything else in modern society, science does not lie beyond the reach of social media. And thank goodness for that.

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Patel, Aniruddh D., Iversen, John R., Bregman, Micah R., & Schulz, Irena (2009). Experimental Evidence for Synchronization to a Musical Beat in a Nonhuman Animal Current Biology, 19 (10), 827-830 DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2009.03.038

The Changing Face of Science: Part One

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While waiting for the L train to attend the American Academy for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting this week, I came upon Nicholas Kristof’s latest New York Times op-ed: “Professors, We Need You!” In his piece, Kristof portrays professors as out-of-touch intellectuals who study esoteric fields and hide their findings in impenetrable jargon. He also says that academia crushes rebels who communicate their science to the public. I admire Mr. Kristof for his efforts to bring awareness to injustices around the world and I agree that academic papers are often painful – if not impossible – to read. But my experience at the AAAS conference this week highlights how wrong he is, both in his depiction of academics and of the driving forces within academia itself.

AAAS is the organization behind Science magazine, ScienceNOW news, Science Careers, and the AAAS fellowship programs. Among the goals in its mission statement: to enhance communications among scientists, engineers, and the public; to provide a voice for science on societal issues; and to increase public engagement with science and technology. So yes, you would expect their conference to focus on science communication. Still, the social media sessions (Engaging with Social Media and Getting Started in Social Media) were full of scientists of all ages. Another well-attended session taught listeners how to use sites and services like Google Scholar, Mendeley, ORCID, and ResearchGate to improve the visibility of their work online.

Throughout the conference, scientists were live-tweeting interesting facts and commentary from the sessions they attended using the #AAASmtg hashtag. I saw a particularly wonderful example of this at a Saturday morning symposium called Building Babies. All five of the speakers at the symposium have accounts on Twitter and four of them were live-tweeting during each other’s presentations. Three of them (Kate Clancy, Julienne Rutherford, and Katie Hinde) also have popular blogs: Context and Variation, BANDIT, and Mammals Suck, respectively. After the symposium, Dr. Hinde compiled the symposium-related tweets on Storify.

I won’t claim that this panel of speakers is representative of scientists as a whole, but I do believe that they are representative of the direction in which scientists are moving. And contrary to Mr. Kristof’s claims, I would argue that their public visibility and embrace of online communication have probably helped rather than hindered their careers. Increased visibility can lead to more invitations to give talks, more coverage from the science press, and added connections outside of one’s narrow field of expertise. The first two of these can fill out a CV and attract positive public attention to a department, both pluses for a young academic who’s up for tenure. Moreover, while hiring and tenure decisions are made within departments, funding comes from organizations and institutions that typically value plain-speaking scientists who do research with societal relevance. For these reasons (and, I’m sure, others), it’s becoming obvious that scientists can benefit from clarity, accessibility, and visibility. In turn, many scientists are learning the necessary skills and making inroads to communicating with the public.

Of course, public visibility offers both promise and peril for scientists. As climate scientist and blogger Kim Cobb explained in her wonderful AAAS talk, scientists worry about appearing biased or unprofessional when they venture into the public conversation on social media. Science writer and former researcher Bethany Brookshire mentioned another potential peril: the fact that thoughtless or offensive off-the-cuff comments made on social media can come back to haunt scientists in their professional lives. It is also certainly true in academia (as it is in most spheres) that people are disdainful of peers who seem arrogant or overly self-promotional.

In short, scientists hoping to reach the public have their work cut out for them. They must learn how to talk about science in clear and comprehensible terms for non-scientists. They must be engaging yet appropriate in public forums and strike the right balance between public visibility and the hard-won research results to back up the attention they receive. They have good reason to tread carefully as they wade into the rapid waters of the Twitterverse, the blogosphere, and other wide-open forums. Yet in they are wading all the same.

There have already been some great responses to Kristof’s call for professors. Political scientist Erik Voeten argued that many academics already engage the public in a variety of ways. Political scientist Robin Corey pointed out that the engagement of academics with the public is often stymied by a lack of time and funding. Academics are rarely paid for the time they spend communicating with the public and may need to concentrate their efforts on academic publications and grant applications because of the troubling job market and funding situation.

Still, many academics are ready to take the plunge and engage with the public. What they need is more training and guidance. Graduate programs should provide better training in writing and communicating science. Universities and  societies should offer mentorship and seminars for scientists who want to improve the visibility of their research via the web. We need to have many more panels and discussions like the ones that took place at the AAAS meeting this week.

Oh, and while we’re at it: fewer misinformed, stereotypical descriptions of stodgy professors in ivory towers would be nice.

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Photo credit: Ian Britton, used via Creative Commons license

Outsourcing Memory

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Do you rely on your spouse to remember special events and travel plans? Your coworker to remember how to submit some frustrating form? Your cell phone to store every phone number you’ll ever need? Yeah, me too. You might call this time saving or delegating, but if you were a fancy psychologist you’d call it transactive memory.

Transactive memory is a wonderful concept. There’s too much information in this world to know and remember. Why not store some of it in “the cloud” that is your partner or coworker’s brain or in “the cloud” itself, whatever and wherever that is? The idea of transactive memory came from the innovative psychologist Daniel Wegner, most recently of Harvard, who passed away in July of this year. Wegner proposed the idea in the mid-80s and framed it in terms of the “intimate dyad” – spouses or other close couples who know each other very well over a long period of time.

Transactive memory between partners can be a straightforward case of cognitive outsourcing. I remember monthly expenses and you remember family birthdays. But it can also be a subtler and more interactive process. For example, one spouse remembers why you chose to honeymoon at Waikiki and the other remembers which hotel you stayed in. If the partners try to recall their honeymoon together, they can produce a far richer description of the experience than if they were to try separately.

Here’s an example from a recent conversation with my husband. It began when my husband mentioned that a Red Sox player once asked me out.

“Never happened,” I told him. And it hadn’t. But he insisted.

“You know, years ago. You went out on a date or something?”

“Nope.” But clearly he was thinking of something specific.

I thought really hard until a shred of a recollection came to me. “I’ve never met a Red Sox player, but I once met a guy who was called up from the farm team.”

My husband nodded. “That guy.”

But what interaction did we have? I met the guy nine years ago, not long before I met my husband. What were the circumstances? Finally, I began to remember. It wasn’t actually a date. We’d gone bowling with mutual friends and formed teams. The guy – a pitcher – was intensely competitive and I was the worst bowler there. He was annoyed that I was ruining our team score and I was annoyed that he was taking it all so seriously. I’d even come away from the experience with a lesson: never play games with competitive athletes.

Apparently, I’d told the anecdote to my husband after we met and he remembered a nugget of the story. Even though all of the key details from that night were buried somewhere in my brain, I’m quite sure that I would never have remembered them again if not for my husband’s prompts. This is a facet of transactive memory, one that Wegner called interactive cueing.

In a sense, transactive memory is a major benefit of having long-term relationships. Sharing memory, whether with a partner, parent, or friend, allows you to index or back up some of that memory. This fact also underscores just how much you lose when a loved one passes away. When you lose a spouse, a parent, a sibling, you are also losing part of yourself and the shared memory you have with that person. After I lost my father, I noticed this strange additional loss. I caught myself wondering when I’d stopped writing stories on his old typewriter. I realized I’d forgotten parts of the fanciful stories he used to tell me on long drives. I wished I could ask him to fill in the blanks, but of course it was too late.

Memories can be shared with people, but they can also be shared with things. If you write in a diary, you are storing details about current experiences that you can access later in life. No spouse required. You also upload memories and information to your technological gadgets. If you store phone numbers in your cell phone and use bookmarks and autocomplete tools in your browser, you are engaging in transactive memory. You are able to do more while remembering less. It’s efficient, convenient, and downright necessary in today’s world of proliferating numbers, websites, and passwords.

In 2011, a Science paper described how people create transactive memory with online search engines. The study, authored by Betsy Sparrow, Jenny Liu, and Wegner, received plenty of attention at the time, including here and here.

In one experiment, they asked participants either hard or easy questions and then had them do a modified Stroop task that involved reporting the physical color of a written word rather than naming the word. This was a measure of priming, essentially whether a participant has been thinking about that word or similar concepts recently. Sometimes the participants were tested with the names of online search engines (Google, Yahoo) and at others they were tested with other name brands (Nike, Target). After hard questions, the participants took much longer to do the Stroop task with Google and Yahoo than with the other brand names, suggesting that hard questions made them automatically think about searching the Internet for the answer.

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The other experiments described in the paper showed that people are less likely to remember trivia if they believe they will be able to look it up later. When participants thought that items of trivia were saved somewhere on a computer, they were also more likely to remember where the items were saved than they were to remember the actual trivia items themselves. Together, the study’s findings suggest that people actively outsource memory to their computers and to the Internet. This will come as no surprise to those of us who can’t remember a single phone number offhand, don’t know how to get around without the GPS, and hop on our smartphones to answer the simplest of questions.

Search engines, computer atlases, and online databases are remarkable things. In a sense, we’d be crazy not to make use of them. But here’s the rub: the Internet is jam-packed with misinformation or near-miss information. Anti-vaxxers, creationists, global warming deniers: you can find them all on the web. And when people want the definitive answer, they almost always find themselves at Wikipedia. While Wikipedia has valuable information, it is not written and curated by experts. It is not always the God’s-honest-truth and it is not a safe replacement for learning and knowing information ourselves. Of course, the memories of our loved ones aren’t foolproof either, but at least they don’t carry the aura of authority that comes with a list of citations.

Speaking of which. There is now a Wikipedia page for “The Google Effect” that is based on the 2011 Science article. A banner across the top shows an open book featuring a large question mark and the following warning: “This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source. . . . Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources.” The citation for the first section is a dead link. The last section has two placeholders for citations, but in lieu of numbers they say, According to whom?

Folks, if that ain’t a reminder to be wary of the outsourcing your brain to Google and Wikipedia, I don’t know what is.

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Photo credits:

1. Photo by Mike Baird on Flickr, used via Creative Commons license

2. Figure from “Google Effects on Memory: Cognitive Consequences of Having Information at Our Fingertips” by Betsy Sparrow, Jenny Liu, and Daniel M. Wegner.

Sparrow B, Liu J, & Wegner DM (2011). Google effects on memory: cognitive consequences of having information at our fingertips. Science (New York, N.Y.), 333 (6043), 776-8 PMID: 21764755

Becca Versus the Web

I was warned. “It’ll go by so fast,” someone told me. “You’ll blink and it will all be over.”

And it was. As hard as I tried not to blink, as much as I tried to remember, my wedding day was over before I could really appreciate that it had even begun. Hours upon amazing hours, gone. Where did they all go?

I spent most of the honeymoon trying to retrieve them. I ran over the details with my husband. “I didn’t know who had your ring and I was being led to the ceremony hall and Auntie – no, your cousin, said . . .” I thought if I sifted through what memories I had, tried them on a time or two, I could crystallize the feelings, sights and smells of those hours. But the more I remembered, the more I misremembered. My husband would gently pipe up, “I don’t think it happened quite like that.” Maybe he was the one misremembering, but chances were good we were both wrong. Research has shown that calling to mind a memory fundamentally changes that memory and, by a process known as reconsolidation, the more you recall a moment in your past, the more your recollection may be warped or degraded. So you see, I should have known better.

While I was roving the West with my husband, pictures and video clips from our wedding began flooding the Internet. We returned from our honeymoon to find every smile, smirk, and stumble immortalized online with perfect accuracy, for everyone to see. Facebook. Picasa. YouTube. We scrolled through them and I wondered, Did I do that? Was that person there? Did it really happen like this?

The answer is yes. The smiles and colors and celebrations must have been exactly like that. At least my memories do match the photos in depicting a day full of happiness and love. But I can’t help feeling a tweak of sadness now too. For all the benefits of my versatile human brain and its skeins of wily neurons, the World Wide Web recollects my wedding day better than I could ever remember myself.

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